Anyone who comes after Putin won’t necessarily be better for Ukraine, ex-Ukrainian FM says

28 May, 07:22 PM
Story
Vladimir Putin (Photo:Kremlin)

Vladimir Putin (Photo:Kremlin)

Even if Russian dictator Vladimir Putin is overthrown, whoever replaces him, even opposition leader Alexei Navalny, will not necessarily be good for Ukraine, former Ukrainian Foreign Minister Pavlo Klimkin told Radio NV on May 27.

"A change of government in Russia will not necessarily work in Ukraine's favor," he said.

"There are various people in Russia who are trying to play different games,” Klimkin said.

“For example, there’s a game around Navalny. I don't rule out that this is a game played between certain Kremlin's towers – to pull out Navalny at some point and say: 'You see, we're much better now. Let's quickly be friends with us, remove sanctions from us.'"

Видео дня

"There are many more options that can actually change the dynamics against us."

According to Klimkin, guarantees for Ukraine's security and supplies of armaments can prevent the destabilization of Europe.

"Now we need to not just bother, but pull the West by the collar and say that the supply of weapons and security cooperation is the main thing that will allow us to talk with Putin from a position of strength," the former official said.

"And only from a position of strength do I see an opportunity to have at least some conscious talks with this regime, I'm not talking about negotiations. There can be no other options at all, and the West must understand that. If he's not able to achieve this, it opens Pandora's box, which destabilizes at least Europe, and possibly much of the world."

Speaking during his last plea in court on May 24, Navalny said that "you (representatives of the Russian regime) will be defeated in the stupid war you are waging in Ukraine."

Earlier on March 22, Moscow-based Lefortovo court sentenced Navalny to nine years in a penal colony and a fine of RUB 1.2 million (about $11,000) in a case of fraud and contempt of court.

Back in January, Navalny appeared on the cover of the TIME magazine titled "The Man Putin Fears."

At the same time, after the occupation of the Crimea, the opposition leader claimed that the Crimea now de facto "belongs" to Russia, and the reality is that the Crimea is "part of Russia" and will never return to Ukraine.

He said that "the Crimea is not a sausage sandwich to be passed back and forth."

Follow us on Twitter, Facebook and Google News

Show more news
X